Contrapposto

Contraposto.jpg
Contraposto.jpg

Contrapposto

8,900.00

Bronze

37”H x 12”W x 8”D

Early sculptures of human figures (i.e., ancient Egyptian art), while anatomically correct, appeared stiff and unnatural. The classical Greeks progressed to where they were able to model the human form in a non symmetrical, relaxed stance that appeared much more realistic. This is described by the Italian word Contrapposto (counterpoise), which translates to "standing with more weight on one leg than on the other leg."  This advance in artistic representation was lost during the dark ages and was rediscovered by the 15th century sculptor, Donatello, during the Italian Renaissance.   


As the early Greeks and Italians discovered, one of the keys to success as a sculptor is to make your subject(s) appear as natural as possible.  Figures that are perfectly symmetrical are generally regarded as amateurish.  Contrapposto representation is a good start, but when I recreate a human form, I attempt to convey body language as well; for it is through body language that we learn so much about an individual.  Health, mental attitude, and disposition are all revealed by a person’s body language.  Although I enjoy sculpting both male and female figures, I have always been more moved and inspired by the female form.  Perhaps this is due to the fact that women seem more relaxed and less “postured” and angular than men, thus making for a more relaxed and natural feeling work of art.

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